Honoring Memorial Day

Lorrie Wilson is our firm’s receptionist and office assistant.  She provides the following:  “In memory of my Uncle Forrest Ramos of the 101st Airborne Division, I would like to give my deepest heartfelt gratitude for not only his choosing to enlist and fight for this great country of ours but sadly, as fate took its course, sacrificing his life.  He will always be in my heart and memory.“  Forrest Ramos served in Vietnam.

[Please click on an image to see it in full.]

James Steinle is an attorney in our firm. He reports: “Frank William Steinle Sr. was an attorney practicing law in the State of Texas when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. After the attack he volunteered for the U.S. Navy at the age of 38. He was assigned to the Pacific Fleet as a Seaman 3rd Class, serving aboard the USS Henrico as a gunner on the 5-inch 38-caliber anti-aircraft gun. For invasions, he went ashore with the 2nd wave to establish ship-to-shore communications. He did this for 4 invasions and was awarded 4 battle stars (Leyte, Guam, Tinian, & Saipan). The Henrico was also in the reserve fleet that came after the invasions of Guadalcanal and Okinawa. At Guadalcanal, when the Japanese counter-attacked and times were really intense, the Navy supplied people they could spare. He was sent ashore, handed a rifle and participated in patrols hunting for snipers. During the battle for Okinawa, his ship was hit by a Kamikaze and severely damaged. Frank W. Steinle Sr. survived the war and returned to his legal practice in Texas at the war’s conclusion.”

Another attorney in our firm had a grandfather, Volf, who fought in the Eastern Theater and ultimately Germany, remaining in the service through the end of the War against the Nazis. Like all our allies,Volf and his compatriots saved uncountable American lives during WWII (sometimes, as in his nation’s case, losing far more soldiers than we did). Their sacrifices should also be commemorated on this day.

John Mlnarik is the firm’s partner (and founder). At the Santa Clara Veteran’s Memorial a memorial brick is placed in honor of his grandfather, John Joseph Mlnarik. John tells us: “John J served in the Army during WWII as a high speed radio operator and was relieved of duty on December 23rd, 1946 to return home to his family in Dodge, Nebraska.” John continues: “My father, Thomas Walter Mlnarik, served over 30 years in the USN and retired as an E-9 Senior Chief. His job was Fire Control, abbreviated ‘FCCS SW’ (Fire Control Chief Senior Surface Warfare). My uncle Richard Mlnarik also served in the USN as a diesel mechanic. He did not take to the sea as his older brothers Tom and Glen had, and he served just 2 short years (he is prone to becoming seasick).  My uncle, Glen Mlnarik, also served over 30 years in the USN. I do not recall his final rank but I know he also rose to the level of Chief. Glen’s Son, Brian Mlnarik, served in the USN as what is commonly referred to as a ‘Sea Bee’. My most memorable moment of his service was when stationed at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Brian sent us a homemade video of him and a few of his buddies riding in a vehicle they aptly named the ‘Land Shark.’ Those are the military men in my family. I thank all of you for honoring them.”

Michele Anderson is our senior paralegal. She reports: “My dad (Carl Miloslavich) was a veteran of World War II. He was a Sergeant in the US Army and was awarded the Silver Star and the Bronze Star and many other commendations. He was drafted as a senior in high school but was allowed to graduate. My dad passed away 10 years ago.”

 

Jim Erickson is an attorney in our office. His late father, Harold L. “Pete” Erickson, Jr., fought with the Seventh Army in the Battle of the Bulge and saw action in France and Germany for more than six months. As a forward artillery observer for the 103rd infantry, he was awarded the Bronze Star for the following: On March 22, 1945, “At Reisdorf, Germany, when the regular radio operator became a casualty, Erickson, although inexperienced, took over the radio. The infantry company to which he was attached was pinned down by heavy machine gun and small arms fire from an enemy pillbox, when Erickson, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, crawled ahead of the company to a position within fifty yards of the pillbox.” From that position he was able to communicate with the artillery battalion and direct artillery assistance to the company. He was also awarded the Croix de Guerre with Silver Star, the highest of the three Croix de Guerre awards made by France, “For exceptional services rendered April 7, 1945.” He also participated in the liberation of a concentration camp in Bavaria, freeing Polish, Italian, and Greek Jews.  In a Rockford, Illinois newspaper in 1945, he was quoted as saying: “The things you’ve heard about what the Germans have done to the Jews are true. I know. I saw it.” On the GI Bill, he attended the University of Cincinnati, where he met Jim’s late mother, Pudge; Pete and Pudge were married in 1949 and had five children. His degree in business ultimately led to his career as the CEO of a major bank in Milwaukee and later as the CFO of a celebrated electronics firm.

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